My daily bread: thoughts on gratitude

I haven’t wanted to write over the last week. My family is in kind of a crazy season right now; it’s been difficult to find the mental space necessary to write. Besides all that, the local government abandoned my library community for a bit – I’m generously calling this a grievous error due to lack of information on their part – by threatening to defund the public library system.

This incident has carried some pretty serious emotional distress for me, I know I am far from alone based on the thirteen pages of letters and statements from our library-loving friends that we carried with us to the budget meeting last night. While the issue is not resolved, I am hopeful we will gain full funding, and the first budget increase in thirteen years as well, for our community within the community.

I didn’t make it into the meeting room last night. The irony of this situation is that we stayed to close the library at its normal time, even while the future of the library was being decided. I may have waited in the hallway, but even then, I wasn’t isolated from the precedings. We were all there together working for the well-being of our community, wanting a chance to add our paragraph and chapter to a much larger story.

I’m not all wrapped in the rosy glow of a hallmark ending this morning, far from it. Our immediate library funding is fixed, but in six months we could be right back in a room trying to show people who make no use of our public facilities understand exactly what it is we do. I’ll be there again, if it happens.

I share all of that to say this, on this chilly and battle-fatigued Thanksgiving Eve, I am grateful for two gifts. The first is being removed from community.

Last fall, I began the great divorce from church. It was a long time coming, and I wish I had mustered up the courage to leave sooner. The toxicity of that specific environment left permanent scars, and for a while, I withdrew from everyone. I prayed without hope for a long time that we could get out of ministry and find a healthier way to live in the world. Although the process of realizing that prayer was painful, I haven’t lived a day since without a profound sense of gratitude for freedom from religious ties altogether.

Although I was part of a congregation, there was no community there for me. I was in the hallway, but I was never part of the process, not even when I was in the room where decisions were being made.

I am daily grateful losing my place in community.

However, the synchronicity of the Universe delights me. In the same month that I signed the contract of silence, I also found my voice. On the same day my husband resigned from his calling, I stepped into mine. At the same time as I experienced profound gratitude not to be part of something, I was becoming part of something else. This is the second great gift of this year.

I could gush for a thousand more words about all the ways this new community has restored and continues to heal my soul. I realize, not every organization, not even every library, is fortunate enough to employ the caliber of people with whom I work. Perhaps we are a one in a million place, and I was just damn lucky to find a space in it. But through the library, I experience welcome for myself and for an entire community. Each day, I get to serve people creatively, and I am trusted to do my work and do it well. These experiences are treasures I hold like chocolate on my tongue, savoring each as it passes.

I believe it is a rare quality in the world to find a space that encourages freedom of thought, access to knowledge, unbiased dissemination of information and celebration of the individual. I don’t profess to do any of this perfectly, but it is the space I inhabit now. In it I have found myself again. I have found my people, as widely varied a community as any I have ever been part of and yet somehow we work together and move forward. Maybe it’s diplomacy and professionalism, but I secretly think it’s also love, for each other and for the world we inhabit, including the people who are in it. At least, that’s how I feel about it. Even when I’m standing in the hallway silently begging the universe to open other people’s eyes to the same experience I live every day.

I am daily grateful for finding my place in community again.

Happy Thanksgiving, friends. I hope wherever you are, and whomever you’re with, you feel welcome and whole. And if not, I hope you find your way to whereever that place may be.